Avoid Allergy Triggers In Your Garden:

Allergy Triggers In Your Garden

Avoid Allergy Triggers In Your Garden:

Allergy Triggers In Your GardenSpring and Summer are wonderful times to get out into the garden and enjoy getting close to nature – unless, of course, you have allergies.

If you’re unfortunate enough to suffer from allergies triggered by pollen and plants, then you’ll want to eradicate the culprits and replace them with plants that will allow you to enjoy your garden without the runny nose, streaming eyes and itchy throat.

First we’ll tell you about some of the common allergy triggers and then we’ll give you a list of plants that will be easier to live with.  It might mean you have to dig up some of your favourites, but, you’ll find that there are equally beautiful alternatives that will allow you to enjoy the outdoors without those nasty side effects.

Common allergy triggers:

Allergy Triggers In Your GardenSunflower: who doesn’t love these giant, sunny blooms? Unfortunately they’re also prone to setting off nasty allergic reactions.

Chamomile: yes, this calming herb is a hay fever trigger.  If you’re especially sensitive, it can also react with your skin and you’ll find drinking Chamomile anything but calming.

Daisies: many of us love those cheerful, down-to-earth blooms, but the pollen, the leaves and even the flowers are often very effective allergy triggers.

Jasmine: this beautifully perfumed vine is also a big allergy trigger – and as we often have this plant indoors or in containers near the house, it’s probably best to avoid it.

Juniper:  one of our B.C. landscape staples, Juniper can cause hay fever and skin rashes.

Allergy Triggers In Your GardenWisteria: it’s such a pity that this showy vine is a quick way to suffer a severe bout of hay fever and even skin rashes.

If you’re feeling a bit disheartened because we’ve pinpointed one or more of your favourite plants, we have good news.  There are alternatives that are just as pretty and rewarding to grow.

Here are some of the easiest alternatives to grow in our climate:

Allergy Triggers In Your GardenEnglish lavender (Lavandula angustifolia). There are any number of lavenders, and you no doubt know, these plants are the ultimate multi-taskers.  The gorgeous purple flowers in Summer can be used for tea, soap, baking, cooking and many other uses.  Lavender is a compact shrub with silvery green leaves – indicating that it’s also a great addition to the xeriscape garden.  It’s not just humans that love lavender, so do pollinators!  It’s hardy, loves everything from full sun to part shade and doesn’t need much water. Simply trim back when flowering is over.

Allergy Triggers In Your GardenRosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis). Rosemary shares many characteristics with Lavender, but has a few more variations including upright, bushy, weeping or creeping varieties. It grows between 1 and 8’ high but will spread as far as allowed. It also attracts your favourite pollinators and is a wonderful addition to your culinary efforts.

Rosemary doesn’t require much maintenance. It doesn’t like too much water and will grow in relatively poor soil. Cut back tips to shape it. Hardiness depends on the specific variety so check with your garden center as to which variety is best for your location.

Allergy Triggers In Your GardenMint (Mentha spp.). If you’re looking for a plant to fill up bare spaces, then mint is it!  It spreads aggressively.  And that’s fine because you can use mint in cooking, baking and in teas!  It’s hardy, easy to grow and doesn’t require much maintenance at all.  Mint grows to about 2’ tall but will spread as far as you allow it to. It likes everything from full sun to part shade.

Allergy Triggers In Your GardenWoolly thyme (Thymus pseudolanuginosus) is an excellent ground cover that grows quickly and in almost any kind of environment. It has small leafed green foliage and small pink flowers throughout summer and grows about 2 – 3” high and about 3’ wide. Woolly thyme likes full sun and requires very little water once established so it’s perfect for xeriscaping. Can be used as a lawn replacement, a wall adornment or anywhere you need some low maintenance cover. All that’s necessary is to trim it back periodically. It attracts butterflies, bees and other pollinators.  It’s hardy to -28.9 C, so it can survive even a cold winter like our last one.

Allergy Triggers In Your Garden hummingbirdsFall phlox (Phlox paniculata) produces fragrant white, pink, rose, red or lavender coloured flowers the whole summer. It’s perennial and very hardy, requiring very little maintenance.  All that’s necessary is to dead head and pinch back tips to encourage the plants to become more bushy instead of lanky.

 

Allergy Triggers In Your GardenClematis: a hardy, long flowering vine that rivals Wisteria for showiness. They like full sun to part shade – keep the roots shady and the rest of the plant in sun for best results.  They like well drained soil but do need regular watering and fertilizing.  They’ll also need some support to climb on. Depending on the variety, these vines can grow quite large – from 10’ to 20’.  Clematis offer a variety of flower colours including white, pink, purple and blue.

Allergy Triggers In Your GardenSweetpeas (Lathyrus spp.) come in varieties including annual and perennial, vines, bushes, and varieties that flower at different times.  They might not be quite as showy as Wisteria, but still offer lots of pretty flowers and fragrance to the garden without the allergy triggers.  They can be a little more picky about their environment, so before planting, check with your local garden center to ensure that your choice of location will yield good results. They require a little maintenance needing regular watering and dead heading.

Allergy Triggers In Your GardenGoldenrod (Solidago spp.) keeps the colour going with swathes of yellow flowers from late summer through the fall. Depending on the variety, they can grow as high as 8’ and will spread by seed.  If you don’t want them to spread, dead head before the seeds appear. If they do spread or become too dense, they can be divided in the Spring. Like many of the plants we’ve mentioned, these happy flowers are almost maintenance free and are especially attractive to pollinators.  They like anything from full sun to part shade and can do well in less than ideal soil conditions.

Allergy Triggers In Your GardenDaylilies (Hemerocallis hybrids)? are easy to grow, low maintenance, hardy perennials that love full sun. They do need regular water as soon as the temperatures warm in spring and right through to the beginning of winter. Daylilies grow 2.5 – 4’ tall and spread 2 to 3’. There are several varieties with different blooming times, and some even re-bloom.  You can choose evergreen, semievergreen and deciduous and can be divided if they become too dense.

How to grow culinary herbs easily in a small space

grow culinary herbs indoor gardening

How to grow culinary herbs easily in a small space

grow culinary herbs

Whether you only have a small garden, or whether you only have a small space you want to devote to herbs, you can still grow more than enough for your own needs!

grow culinary herbs
Here are a few ideas to help you get started:

  1. Container Herb Garden:  The ultimate easy way to grow herbs in very little space is to grow them in containers.  Containers  are often easier than growing herbs in the ground.  First of all you don’t need too many seedlings. Just a few will fill up the container making it look great.  Too few seedlings in the ground can look a little weak.  In addition, you can easily move containers so that you can showcase those that are flowering or take advantage of the best position as the weather and seasons change.container garden herbs
    We recently held a workshop all about herb gardening in planters. If you missed it, never fear – we are still here to answer all your questions and help you get going the right way.
  2. Herb Planters:  These are similar to  containers, but are usually a little more utilitarian and bigger. Using a planter means that you can create a mini ‘raised bed’ easily in a ready made wooden planter or even make your own.  A herb planter can accommodate a number of different varieties of herbs. Come in and chat with us to find out which ones grow well together.  Make your planter mobile by putting it on wheels so that you can take advantage of the best position for your herbs at any one time.herb garden planter3. The Pretty Pot Indoor Garden:  This is perfect if you live in an apartment, don’t have any outdoor space or just want to add some green decor to your kitchen.  Plant each different herb in a pretty pot in the accent color of your choice. Be creative. You don’t necessarily need to buy pots. Mason jars work well as do jam jars or any of a number of containers you might ordinarily put in your recycling bin.  Paint them or cover them in fabric to create the color accent you desire. These make perfect gifts as well as great additions to your home. Place the pots in a spot where they will get bright light – perhaps your kitchen windowsill?  You’ll have a handy, ready made supply of culinary herbs whenever you need them!Herb-as-decor
    4. Hide them in plain sight:  Let’s face it: herbs are often not the prettiest of plants.  If you don’t want to dedicate a space outdoors or indoors for growing them, you can hide them in plain sight by interspersing them amongst your flowers in a flower bed, or amongst your veggies in a vegetable patch.  Come in and chat with us to find out how companion planting should be done so that the herbs will thrive.  An additional benefit to this is that many herbs will ward off pests from your vegetables.